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  • 16 Most Beautiful Cities in Africa

    Considered the poorest continent on the planet, Africa is the home to 54 sovereign nations with some progressing nations who are quite wealthy like Nigeria, Morocco, Tunisia and South Africa. Nigeria in particular is an international oil industry player; is by far Africa’s biggest producer of oil with over 2.5 million barrels produced every day. Not only Africa’s largest oil producer, Nigeria is the fifth highest exporter of oil in the world and Africa’s largest economy. For the past decade Nigeria, Morocco, Equatorial Guinea and Angola has seen some admirable developments.

    Let’s see the some of the most beautiful cities in Africa. The Africa you don’t see on TV!

    Luanda, Angola

    Capital of Africa’s second largest oil producer, Luanda is home to the nation’s main seaport and administrative center. In the past decade, this city has achieved the most developments among any city in Africa. With the help of China International Trust and Investment Corporation (CITIC), Luanda is looking more like a western country

    Agadir, Morocco

    Capital of Agadir-Ida Ou Tanane province, Agadir is one of the major urban centres of Morocco. The city has been rebuilt after the 1960 earthquake. It is now Morocco’s largest seaside resort; attracting tourists from all over the world.

     

     

    read more : http://africanleadership.co.uk/blog/?p=10880

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  • 6 Incredible Stats From the Fastest Women’s 10,000-Meter Race in History

    The Olympic track proved historically speedy on the first day of running events.

    The first medal event on Rio de Janeiro’s Olympic track went off in historic fashion, headlined by Ethiopian Almaz Ayana’s world record performance in 29:17.45. Though Ayana completed the second half of the 25-lap race alone in the lead, her astonishing pace helped push the rest of the field toward record-setting performances of their own. 

    To better understand just how unprecedented the run was, here are six stats from the fastest women’s 10,000-meter race of all time.

    1. Ayana completed the second half of the race in 14:30.64. This 5,000-meter split is more than 10 seconds faster than the Olympic record for the distance. The current 5,000-meter Olympic record is 14:40.79, set by Romanian Gabriela Szabo in 2000 at the Sydney Olympic Games.

    2. Before this race, only five women had run under 30:00 in the 10,000.The top four athletes accomplished the mark in Rio: Ayana, Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya in 29:32.53, Tirunesh Dibaba of Ethiopia in 29:42.56 (the only athlete in the field to previously run sub-30), and Alice Aprot of Kenya in 29:53.51.

    3. This was only Ayana’s second race at 10,000 meters. She debuted at the distance on June 29 of this year, running 30:07.00.

    4. Counting Ayana’s performance, eight women broke their country’s national records in the race, including American Molly Huddle, whose 30:13.17 bettered Shalane Flanagan’s mark by 9 seconds. The countries with records that fell: Ethiopia, Kenya, United States, Sweden, Burundi, Greece, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan.

    5. Eighteen women set personal bests, including American Emily Infeld, who took 11th in 31:26.94. That constitutes just under half of the field putting in lifetime performances.

    6. The difference between Ayana and last-place finisher Marisol Romero of Mexico was more than six minutes, or, at Ayana’s pace, more than five laps of the track.

    Source:-www.runnersworld.com

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  • ‘No Ethiopians wanted’ job ad sparks outrage

     

    Minister says ‘appalling’ racism must end; manpower company behind notice: ‘It was supposed to stay inside the company’

    Justice Ministry officials expressed outrage on Wednesday over a recruitment ad that stated that Israelis of Ethiopian descent were not wanted.The ad, published by the LM manpower company, called for warehouse workers to fold clothes at a Caesarea-based fashion company, Walla reported. The ad noted that the job was 7 a.m.-5 p.m. and paid minimum wage (NIS 25 an hour, or $6.50), and specified that the employer “does not want Ethiopians.”

    Justice Ministry Director Emi Palmor said that, if true, the ad was “a blatant case of discrimination and racism.” Palmor, who also heads a ministerial committee seeking to uproot racism against Ethiopian Israelis, noted that testimony submitted to the committee indicated “this is not the first case, and certainly not the only case.”

    Palmor said the case would be investigated by the commissioner for equal employment opportunities in the Economy Ministry.

    The fashion company, Expose, said in response that it had nothing to do with the offensive caveat, and that the ad was published without its knowledge. “This wasn’t published by us and certainly isn’t acceptable according to our values,” a spokeswoman said. “This doesn’t reflect our opinions at all.”

    The manpower company said the ad was a result of “human error” and that it was removed “the moment we found out.” Notably, the company did not deny the actual request by the client.

    “This was not for publication. It was somehow leaked out. It was supposed to stay inside the company and be dealt with inside the company,” a statement by LM said. “This is not something we promote. Apparently it was a human error. We don’t support racist statements. We believe in recruitment for all ethnic groups and communities.”

    The ad was blasted by Israeli officials.

    Social Equality Minister Gila Gamliel called it “appalling” and said she would bring the matter before the cabinet on Thursday.

    “Racism and discrimination cut through sectors and groups in Israeli society. We must put an end to it once and for all,” she said.

    MK Omer Barlev of the Zionist Union said it was “unacceptable for people of the Ethiopian community to be a punching bag for lowly racists. Not in the State of Israel and not on our watch.” He vowed to promote legislation to prevent such incidents from recurring.

    MK Karin Elharar (Yesh Atid) said it was “shameful… we mustn’t allow this to be a part of society,” while Michal Biran (Zionist Union) said it was shocking to find such displays of racism in present-day Israel.

    In July Palmor submitted a major report to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on ways to combat racism against Israelis of Ethiopian heritage.

    The report was produced by the committee chaired by Palmor, which was established in response to recent public street protests by Ethiopian Israeli activists against what they said was the rampant prejudice they face in Israeli society.

    The issue rose to the fore last year amid accusations by Ethiopian Israelis of rampant police brutality and abuse against members of the community. The community staged a series of demonstrations across the country, triggered by video footage showing a seemingly unprovoked police assault on an Ethiopian-Israeli soldier in April 2015.

    Thousands took to the streets demanding the government address the alleged systematic and institutionalized racism faced by the Ethiopian Israeli community. Activists also expressed their frustration with what they said was the state’s shortcomings in addressing the social and economic needs of their community.

    The latest report marks the conclusion of months of deliberations that resulted from last year’s tensions. It offers 53 detailed recommendations for tackling racism throughout Israeli society, mainly through the education system.

    Upon receiving the report Netanyahu promised to take “further steps” in the wake of the report. Racism, he said, “is unbecoming of our country, our citizens and our nation.”

    source:-www.timesofisrael.com

     

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  • TOP 10 GREATEST BLACK MEN OF ALL TIME

     1. Martin Luther King (1929 – 1968) – King  was an American Baptist minister, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs. 

     

    King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia (the Albany Movement), and helped organize the 1963 nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama, that attracted national attention following television news coverage of the brutal police response. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history.

    On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1965, he helped to organize the Selma to Montgomery marches, and the following year he and SCLC took the movement north to Chicago to work on segregated housing. In the final years of his life, King expanded his focus to include poverty and speak against the Vietnam War, alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled “Beyond Vietnam”.

    In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People’s Campaign, when he wasassassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. His death was followed by riots in many U.S. cities.

    Read More : http://africanleadership.co.uk/blog/?p=10777

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